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NEWS INFUSED ARCHIVE

- Preparing South Dakota Students for Success
- Model Wellness Policy Language for Water Access in Schools
- CDC Releases Competitive Foods and Beverages in U.S. Schools: A Policy Analysis
- Comment Period Open on Proposed Federal Regulation Regarding Food Sold in School
- Leveling the Playing Field for Students with Disabilities




Preparing South Dakota Students for Success

The South Dakota Department of Education (DOE) has identified four key student outcomes for achieving the overall aspiration that all students should leave the K-12 system college, career and life ready.

The outcomes are:
1. All students will enter 4th grade proficient or advanced in reading.
2. All students will enter 9th grade proficient or advanced in math.
3. The gap for Native American students is eliminated.
4. Students graduate high school ready for postsecondary or the workforce.

Underlying the outcomes are vital support systems that lay the groundwork for student success.
• High quality standards and instruction
• Effective teachers and leaders
• Environment conducive to learning
• Families that are engaged

To learn more about the DOE goals and aspirations go to doe.sd.gov/outcomes/





Model Wellness Policy Language for Water Access in Schools

With the passage of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHFKA), federal law now requires schools to make fresh drinking water available during mealtimes in school food service areas at no cost to students. By providing drinking water as an alternative to soda and other sugar-sweetened beverages, schools can promote children’s health overall and play an important role in the fight against childhood obesity.

The National Policy and Legal Analysis Network to Prevent Childhood Obesity (NPLAN) has created a set of model goals and actions for schools to incorporate into their wellness policies to help promote access to free, safe drinking water. The language is designed to be tailored to the needs of an individual school district or local educational agency.





CDC Releases Competitive Foods and Beverages in U.S. Schools: A Policy Analysis

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) conducted an analysis of state laws and policies (as of October 1, 2010) to determine how closely state competitive food policies align with the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools.

The Competitive Foods and Beverages in U.S. Schools: A Policy Analysis report provides a snapshot of policies for competitive foods in schools in 39 states. Key findings of the report, as of October 1, 2010 are:

• 39 states have a state law, regulation or policy related to the sale or availability of competitive foods and beverages in schools
• No state policy fully aligned with all IOM standards
• The majority of policies were in the lower quartiles of alignment
• In general, state policies for competitive foods and beverages for elementary school were more aligned with IOM standards compared with policies for middle and high school

The policy analysis report can be used to help support the implementation of evidence-based recommendations from the 2011 CDC School Health Guidelines to Promote Healthy Eating and Physical Activity.





Comment Period Open on Proposed Federal Regulation Regarding Food Sold in School

The US Department of Agriculture’s proposed rule on Nutrition Standards for All Foods Sold in School was published in the Federal Register on February 8, 2013.

The proposed rules should be reviewed by school administrators, business offices, boards, food service, teachers, and the community. Students may also want to review this since they are the consumers. The comment period is 60 days – until April 9, 2013. The proposed rule includes addresses to submit comments by mail or through the Federal eRulemaking Portal.

The official name of this proposed rule is National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program: Nutrition Standards for All Foods Sold in School as Required by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010; Proposed Rule.





Leveling the Playing Field for Students with Disabilities

A new directive from the United States Department of Education mandated that all high schools offer sports programs for disabled students . This is a landmark moment for students with disabilities who, according to a 2012 government study, are most often at greater risk of being sedentary.

"Sports can provide invaluable lessons in discipline, selflessness, passion and courage, and this guidance will help schools ensure that students with disabilities have an equal opportunity to benefit from lessons they can learn on the playing field or on the court," said U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan in a statement announcing the mandate.





March 2013